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Diabetes can be treated

Diabetes can be treated

17 January 2018

Over 200,000 people in New Zealand have been diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic and sometimes life-threatening disease that affects three times as many Māori and Pacific Islanders as it does other cultures.

And Ministry of Health figures suggest there are another 100,000 New Zealanders who have not yet been diagnosed with diabetes.

There are three types of diabetes – type 1, an auto-immune condition where the body attacks the cells that produce insulin, type 2, the most common form of diabetes and which can be maintaining a healthy diet, weight and lifestyle and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy.

Diabetes is characterised by how the body produces and manages the hormone insulin. Insulin is required by the body to balance our blood sugars, which increase when we consume carbohydrates and sugary foods.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Nurse Practitioner Esme Moloney says if diabetes is not managed properly, it can have serious complications including blindness, amputation of limbs, kidney disease and analysis, heart disease, stroke, periodontal disease and reduced life expectancy.

“But these complications can be avoided if a person maintains a healthy lifestyle and weight, exercises regularly and eats well to manage their blood sugars,” she says.

Some of the symptoms of diabetes are excessive thirst and urination, fatigue and weakness, changes in vision, fruity breath odour, increased hunger, and more frequent and hard-to-heal infections.

For more information, go to www.diabetes.org.nz

Current News

Kaumātua Olympics 2018

21 May 2018

Age will prove no barrier for the 160 kaumātua coming together later this month for the fourth bi-annual Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Kaumātua Olympics.

Hot on the heels of the Commonwealth Games and the Winter Olympics, kaumātua from as far afield as Taranaki will compete for their equivalent of the gold, silver and bronze medals – the prestigious Marutūahu,  Moehau and Te Aroha taonga -  all designed by Darin Jenkins (Ngāti Tama-te-rā) and carved by Joseph Ihaia (Rangitihi / Ngāi Tūhoe).

While the competition might be fierce, the walls of the Silver Ferns Farm Centre in Te Aroha will likely resound to the sound of music, laughter, chatter and lost marbles as kaumātua tackle all manner of games from corn toss and memory to cups and the much-loved Noodle Hockey.

Kaumātua programme services co-ordinator Hariata Adams says the event upholds Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki vision of Hauraki as a Healthy Nation and their values of Whanaungatanga, Manākitanga and Kotahitanga – working alongside and caring for each other. 

“It is about Whānau Ora and ensuring we provide services that wrap around our whānau, support their aspirations toward wellness and build upon our vision for Hauraki to be a healthy nation,” she says.

“We want out kaumātua to know that there is life outside of the house and TV and that they can get out and do things in the community.” 

The first Kaumātua Olympics was held in Thames in 2012, then in Whangamāta in 2014 and Paeroa in 2016. This year, 16 teams of 10  will converge on Te Aroha from Taranaki (4), Maniapoto (3), Hamilton (2), Tauranga and Tokoroa (1 each) and Hauraki rohe (5).

Kaumātua will have one physical game followed by a quiet game such as Memory or cup stacking or even a cup of tea so they can have a rest in between.

The day will begin with a Powhiri at 9am followed by a team March Past, with warmdown at 1.30pm and prizegiving at 2pm.

What: Kaumātua Olympics

Where: Silver Ferns Farm Centre

44 Stanley Street

Te Aroha

When: Thursday, May 31

Time: 9am – 3pm

Caption:  Whangamatā Orca team members Sheryle Winikerei, left, Shayne Campbell, Penny Taylor and Michael Hunter, with James Andrews, rear, took out the esteemed Marutūahu trophy in 2016.

 

 

 

Caption:  Whangamatā Orca team members Sheryle Winikerei, left, Shayne Campbell, Penny Taylor and Michael Hunter, with James Andrews, rear, took out the esteemed Marutūahu trophy in 2016.

 

Caption:  Whangamatā Orca team members Sheryle Winikerei, left, Shayne Campbell, Penny Taylor and Michael Hunter, with James Andrews, rear, took out the esteemed Marutūahu trophy in 2016.

 

Caption:  Whangamatā Orca team members Sheryle Winikerei, left, Shayne Campbell, Penny Taylor and Michael Hunter, with James Andrews, rear, took out the esteemed Marutūahu trophy in 2016.

Tamariki Ora/Well Child - reaching those important milestones

23 April 2018

Raising a baby can be a wonderful experience, but at times it can be daunting and overwhelming – even more so when you’re a young mum.

At 18, Zariah Timothy is mum to Mataira Timothy-Gillett, who, at four months old, is thriving on her whānau and young mum’s aroha.

But, regardless of age and whānau support, new mums still need reassurance that their babies are reaching all their milestones and that they have access to the appropriate health services and checks that set the foundation for their lifelong health and wellbeing.

Tamariki Ora Well Child is a Ministry of Health initiative offering a series of health assessments, immunisation education and support services for children and their families from birth to five years. The programme is delivered to 645 children throughout Hauraki rohe by health provider Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki.

It also includes health promotion activities and is an important gateway for parents to access primary and specialist health care, education and social services.

Tamariki Ora Well Child nurse visits can start at birth or at six weeks, depending on the midwife’s referral. 

Registered nurse Krista Harries has been visiting Mataira in her own home since she was six weeks old. While mums can also opt to take their babies to a clinic, Zariah, from Thames, appreciates the convenience of not having to take her baby out of the house when it’s time for her check-ups.

“Keeping baby in her own home keeps her happy and settled during the visits and makes Krista’s visits a little easier,” she says.

Zariah also enjoys the “whānau-based approach” Tamariki Ora Well Child offers.

“When Krista comes, it’s almost like a friend coming to visit baby and me, not just a nurse,” she says.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Manager of Oranga o te Tangata (Public Health and Health Promotion Services) Debbie Petersen-Pilcher says Tamariki Ora Well Child also works closely with other services to support families where needed.

“It is about whānau ora and ensuring we provide services that wrap around our whānau, support their aspirations toward wellness and build upon our vision for Hauraki to be a healthy nation,” she says.

 

 

 

Let's talk about mental health

10 April 2018

Those who have experienced mental health and /or addiction issues or who know or support someone who has, have the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences in a series of hui around the Hauraki and Waikato rohe designed to ensure people get the right support when they want and need it.

Five “Let’s Talk About What Matters to You” hui will be held in Ngātea, Colville, Coromandel, Te Aroha and Paeroa this month. The hui are run by the Waikato District Health Board in conjunction with Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki, and will help guide the new direction of mental health and addiction services in the Hauraki and Waikato rohe.

Mental health services don’t always meet the needs of the people they are intended to help and the hui will enable people to have a say in their own and their loved ones’ futures. 

For more information, or to register your interest to attend, contact Fiona Wasiolek 07 868 0033; fiona.wasiolek@korowai.co.nz or Jennifer Ashman 07 839 8899 ext 97409 or email jennifer.ashman@waikatodhb.health.nz

Let's Talk mental health

26 March 2018

Those who have experienced mental health and /or addiction issues or who know or support someone who has, have the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences in a hui designed to ensure people get the right support when they want and need it.

The “Let’s Talk About What Matters to You” hui on April 5, run by the Waikato District Health Board in conjunction with Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki, will help guide the new direction of mental health and addiction services in the Hauraki and Waikato rohe.

Mental health services don’t always meet the needs of the people they are intended to help and the hui will enable people to have a say in their own and their loved ones’ futures. 

The hui will be held at the Thames Memorial Civic Centre in two sessions – from 9am-12 noon for those who have experienced health and addiction issues, their whānau, support workers, helpers, friends and other interested people; and the 12.20-4pm session for service providers, primary health, government agencies, NGOs, community members and schools.

The hui will move around the Waikato District over the next three months,  including Ngātea (April 16),  Coromandel, Colville (April 17), Paeroa, Te Aroha (April 23); Waihī, Whangamatī(May 15);  Whitianga (May 25) and Tairua (June 12). 

For more information, or to register your interest to attend, contact Fiona Wasiolek 07 868 0033; fiona.wasiolek@korowai.co.nz or Jennifer Ashman 07 839 8899 ext 97409 or email jennifer.ashman@waikatodhb.health.nz

Watch this page for venue updates.

 

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