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Under 5 Energise programme cuts tooth decay

Under 5 Energise programme cuts tooth decay

27 June 2017

Cutting out sugar has cut tooth decay in Waikato preschool children by a fifth, according to an article in the NZ Herald.

The Under 5 Energize programme, started in 2013 in 121 of the Waikato's 500 early childhood centres, has cut the number of children with visible tooth decay in their before-school health checks from 10.9 per cent to 8.7 per cent.

Under 5 Energize is contracted to Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki to cover the Thames-Hauraki rohe.

For full story, click on the link below: 

Healthier kids

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Prostate Cancer Awareness

26 September 2018

Every day, two New Zealand tane will lose their lives to prostate cancer. They could be your father, brother, uncle, grandfather, husband or your mate.

Early diagnosis is critical - if detected and treated early, 600 lives a year could be saved.

This month is Blue September and the Prostate Cancer Foundation is raising awareness and funds through initiating ‘Blue Do’ events, where the community can organise fundraisers such as an office morning tea, a baking sale or fishing trip - anything to get a team together to raise vital funds to fight prostate cancer and spread the message for men to look after their health and get checked.

The prostate is a gland located behind a man’s bladder. Part of the reproductive system, it is regulated by the male sex hormone testosterone and is responsible for producing the majority of fluid that makes up semen.

The size of the prostate changes with age, growing rapidly during puberty - fuelled by an increase in hormones - but in an adult it should be the size of a walnut. 

Many men begin to have problems with their prostate as they get older. The Prostate Cancer Foundation says most can be caused by simple enlargement of the prostate, but a few are caused by cancer. 

Regular prostate PSA tests are recommended for men over the age of 40 if there is a family history of prostate cancer; or who are between the ages of 50 and 70. PSA is a small protein released into the blood by the prostate and if levels in the blood are high it is an indicator that there may be abnormalities in the prostate gland. 

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Clinical Services Manager Taima Campbell says prostate cancer may not exhibit symptoms in the early stages so it is important for men to be vigilant in noticing any changes and to have regular check-ups.

“Men having any problems such as pain, fever, swelling, blood and pus in the urine or problems passing urine should consult their doctor without delay,” she says.

 For more information, go to www.prostate.org.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, contact

JoAnn Belworthy

Communications & Marketing

Phone: 021 027 48490

Email: joann.belworthy@korowai.co.nz

Te wiki o te Reo Māori

9 September 2018

This week is Te wiki o te Reo Māori - Māori Language Week

He mauri te reo Māori nō Aotearoa māu, mā tātou katoa'

Make Te Reo Māori an essential part of New Zealand for you, for us all

Ahakoa iti, ākona, kōrerotia

Learn a little, use a little

Ten minutes could save a woman's life

8 September 2018

FREE CERVICAL SCREENING

Taking 10 minutes out of a woman’s day could save her life. That woman could be your mother, wife, daughter, niece, auntie, nana – or it could be you.

Ten minutes is the time it takes to have a cervical screening (smear) test to detect abnormal cells in a woman’s cervix that could lead to cervical cancer. 

This month is cervical Screening Awareness Month and a reminder for all women who have been sexually active to have their cervical smear. 

Every year 160 New Zealand women develop cervical cancer, with 50 dying from it. And yet it is one of the most preventable forms of cancer – as long as the cell changes that cause it are detected early.

Cervical cancer refers to the abnormal, uncontrolled growth of cells in the cervix, the lower part of the uterus (womb).  It usually develops very slowly, with the first signs showing up as ‘abnormal’ cells, which can then take more than 10 years to develop into cancer.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki  Poukura Hauora - Clinical Services Manager - Taima Campbell says women and their whānau should make cervical screening a priority.

“Abnormal cell changes might not show any symptoms until they become cancerous, which is why early detection through screening and follow-up treatment is important,” she says.

 “We can’t stress enough how important it is that our wāhine keep up to date with their smear tests because we know that they can save their life.”

Treatment can be as simple as removing the affected tissue.

Many women are embarrassed or whakāma about having a cervical smear test and Taima says the clinic’s female nurses will do everything they can to make sure a woman feels comfortable during the short procedure. 

Without screening, about 1 in 90 women will develop cervical cancer, with 1 out of 200 dying from it, whereas with screening, 1 out of 570 women will develop cervical cancer, with 1 out of 1280 dying from it.

Three-yearly cervical smear tests are recommended for all women aged 20 to 70 who have ever been sexually active. 

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki offers free cervical screening to all its enrolled clients. Please phone  our Whānau Health Centres - Thames: 07 868 0033, Te Aroha: 07 884 9208,  Paeroa: 07 862 9284, Coromandel: 07 866 8084 or FREEPHONE 0508 tekorowai; 0508 835 676

 

 

For more information, contact

JoAnn Belworthy

Communications & Marketing

Phone: 021 027 48490

Email: joann.belworthy@korowai.co.nz

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