News

Going pink for breast cancer

Going pink for breast cancer

2 June 2017

It was pink, pink, pink everywhere on Wednesday as kaimahi and kaumātua came together at Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki to raise funds for Breast Cancer.

After setting a target of $200, the Pink Ribbon breakfast held at the Wharehui in Thames and outer clinics raised the grand total of $366.40

While kaimahi had fun dressing up on the day – CEO Riana Manuel reiterated the sobering fact of why everyone had gathered – that 8 women a day in New Zealand and 20 men each year are diagnosed with breast cancer.

Kaimahi and kaumātua gathered at the Wharehui kitchen early – cooking up batches of pink pancakes, whizzing up pink smoothies and decorating the walls with pink flags and balloons, while the tables boasted pink tablecloths, serviettes, plates and flowers and an incredible range of delectable and healthy delights kaimahi and kaumātua had poured their aroha into creating - ranging from cupcake salads, chia porridge and protein cookies to berry bliss balls, muffins and mueslis served in the tiniest of cups.

Two quizzes were held, with Debbie Petersen, Poukura Oranga, Manager Public and Health Services, acting as Quizmaster.

The first quiz offered fun general knowledge questions such as: “Where are bagels made?” (surprisingly, it wasn’t the USA – it was Poland!), while the other was a breast awareness educational quiz, kaimahi and kaumātua learning breast cancer information, such as when a woman should start having mammograms (40 years), the smallest size a lump can be detected by mammogram (2mm) and how much was raised via the 2016 Pink Ribbon Breakfasts - $1.7 m.

Mel Shea, Poukura Pūtea, Finance Controller won the educational quiz, with various kaimahi winning brooches, keyrings and balloons in the fun quiz.

Mel also supplied a sweet fundraiser, with Jo Belworthy, Communications and Marketing, correctly guessing that there were 66 pink marshmallows in a jar, while Poukura Tāngata Emma Redaelli’s son Jack was the closest guess to the number of red liquorice in the jar - guessing 99 for the 100 that were in there!!

Funds from the nationwide Pink Ribbon Breakfasts will go towards funding vital research as well as support for those who have already been diagnosed with breast cancer.

A grand fundraising effort and a lot of fun. Tumeke!

Current News

Waitangi Day Paeroa

5 February 2018

Head along to the Paeroa Domain tomorrow for Waitangi Day celebrations from 1-5pm. See attached poster for more info.

Be sun smart this summer

31 January 2018

With all this hot weather, it is even more important that our whānau are taking care of their skin health.

Over 4000 people are diagnosed with melanoma every year in New Zealand, with about 300 people dying from the disease.  

A melanoma is a cancerous growth often resembling, or developing, from moles. 

It is the fourth most common cancer in New Zealand, which has the highest incidence of melanoma in the world.  

Most melanomas are caused by exposure to UV radiation in sunlight. According to the Ministry of Health, sun exposure in childhood gives a greater risk of melanoma than sun exposure in later life.  

And for those who soak it up while on holiday, be warned - there is a greater risk associated with those who have high doses of sun exposure occasionally, such as during holiday and recreational activities, than there is for those who work outside continuously.  

 Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Nurse Practitioner Esme Maloney says if melanoma is recognised and treated early, it can often be cured.  

“But if it is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body, where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal,” she says. 

Esme says the risk of melanoma can be reduced by avoiding sunburn and protecting the skin against harmful UV radiation.  

“Sit under a shady tree, wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts, hats that cover your neck and ears and UV sunglasses and avoid the sun in the hottest part of the day,” she says. 

“And make sure you wear protective sunscreen. Look for sunscreens with a broad spectrum containing both UVA and UvB protection, and a SPF factor of at least 30. It is also important to remember to reapply sunscreen every two hours when you are spending time in the sun.”  

A good way to remember what signs to look for is to become familiar with the moles, freckles and lesions you have and be aware of any changes to moles or those that are newly developed, she says.    

In existing moles look for any changes – this can mean a change in size, shape, colour, elevation or any new symptom such as bleeding, itching or crusting. 

Ask yourself - is the mole starting to change? Is it different from all the other moles or freckles in your skin?

Anyone who suspects they have a melanoma should see their GP immediately. 

Over 4000 people are diagnosed with melanoma every year in New Zealand, with about 300 people dying from the disease.  

A melanoma is a cancerous growth often resembling, or developing, from moles. 

It is the fourth most common cancer in New Zealand, which has the highest incidence of melanoma in the world.  

Most melanomas are caused by exposure to UV radiation in sunlight. According to the Ministry of Health, sun exposure in childhood gives a greater risk of melanoma than sun exposure in later life.  

 And for those who soak it up while on holiday, be warned - there is a greater risk associated with those who have high doses of sun exposure occasionally, such as during holiday and recreational activities, than there is for those who work outside continuously.  

 Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Nurse Practitioner Esme Maloney says if melanoma is recognised and treated early, it can often be cured.  

“But if it is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body, where it becomes hard to treat and can be fatal,” she says. 

Esme says the risk of melanoma can be reduced by avoiding sunburn and protecting the skin against harmful UV radiation.  

“Sit under a shady tree, wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts, hats that cover your neck and ears and UV sunglasses and avoid the sun in the hottest part of the day,” she says. 

“And make sure you wear protective sunscreen. Look for sunscreens with a broad spectrum containing both UVA and UvB protection, and a SPF factor of at least 30. It is also important to remember to reapply sunscreen every two hours when you are spending time in the sun.”  

A good way to remember what signs to look for is to become familiar with the moles, freckles and lesions you have and be aware of any changes to moles or those that are newly developed, she says.    

In existing moles look for any changes – this can mean a change in size, shape, colour, elevation or any new symptom such as bleeding, itching or crusting. 

Ask yourself - is the mole starting to change? Is it different from all the other moles or freckles in your skin?

Anyone who suspects they have a melanoma should see their GP immediately. 

Diabetes can be treated

17 January 2018

Over 200,000 people in New Zealand have been diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic and sometimes life-threatening disease that affects three times as many Māori and Pacific Islanders as it does other cultures.

And Ministry of Health figures suggest there are another 100,000 New Zealanders who have not yet been diagnosed with diabetes.

There are three types of diabetes – type 1, an auto-immune condition where the body attacks the cells that produce insulin, type 2, the most common form of diabetes and which can be maintaining a healthy diet, weight and lifestyle and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy.

Diabetes is characterised by how the body produces and manages the hormone insulin. Insulin is required by the body to balance our blood sugars, which increase when we consume carbohydrates and sugary foods.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Nurse Practitioner Esme Moloney says if diabetes is not managed properly, it can have serious complications including blindness, amputation of limbs, kidney disease and analysis, heart disease, stroke, periodontal disease and reduced life expectancy.

“But these complications can be avoided if a person maintains a healthy lifestyle and weight, exercises regularly and eats well to manage their blood sugars,” she says.

Some of the symptoms of diabetes are excessive thirst and urination, fatigue and weakness, changes in vision, fruity breath odour, increased hunger, and more frequent and hard-to-heal infections.

For more information, go to www.diabetes.org.nz

Kia ora te reo Māori

8 September 2017

 “Kia ora te reo Māori” is the theme for Māori Language Week from September 11-17.

The theme was chosen to celebrate New Zealand’s indigenous greeting and uplift and enliven te reo Māori.

Māori Language Week is an opportunity for everyone to celebrate and practice one of our three official languages.

In 2013, about 125,000 people spoke Māori in New Zealand – representing about 21 per cent of the Māori population and 3 per cent of all New Zealanders.

New figures from Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori show that there are now 130,000 people in New Zealand with “conversational fluency”, 300,000 school and 10,000 tertiary students learning the language, with more children picking it up in homes in places where it had died out in the seventies.

So, while Māori Language Week raises the awareness to speak te reo, let’s keep that awareness ongoing – say the words out loud so they become second nature.  Practice with your friends, whānau, fellow kaimahi, open and sign off your correspondence using new phrases and this time next year you’ll be that much more fluent and comfortable speaking te reo. 

Currently there are a number of opportunities to engage in te reo learning through Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki and also through Te Whare Tāhuhu Kōrero o Hauraki and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori has provided some great resources on their website to help you learn more words and phrases, including booklets, with some in comic and picture form so you can visually make the word associations.

And if you want to take it that step further, a reo challenge from Mahuru Māori is to speak, read and write EVERYTHING in Māori for the month of September - regardless of who you speak to, where you speak it, and when you speak it. It’s a tall challenge for some, but if you’re up for it and want to sign up, go to https://www.twoa.ac.nz/campaigns/MahuruMaori2017

To celebrate the launch of Māori Language Week, Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori has planned a parade in Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington) on Monday, September 11 and is encouraging groups from the community to join in, including universities, wānanga, schools, kura, play centres, early childhood centres, kindergartens, kōhanga reo, sports teams, groups, kapa haka, marae and hapū.

Kia pai te mutunga wiki whānau.

 

 

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