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The devastating complications of Diabetes

The devastating complications of Diabetes

16 November 2018

Amputated limbs, blindness, erectile dysfunction, stroke, kidney and heart disease are just a few complications of a condition suffered by over 200,000 New Zealanders.

Diabetes is a sometimes life-threatening disease that affects three times as many Māori and Pacific Islanders as it does other cultures. 

And Ministry of Health figures suggest that another 100,000 New Zealanders could have the condition without realising it.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki dietictian Claire Cannon says once a person gets over the initial shock of a diabetes diagnosis they can focus on implementing positive changes to improve their health.

“I have seen people make a real positive difference to their health by improving their diet, becoming more active and reducing stress,” she says.

Diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, doesn’t do its job properly. Insulin is needed to balance our blood sugars, which increase when we consume carbohydrates and sugary foods. 

There are three types of diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune condition where the body attacks the cells that produce insulin. Without insulin blood levels in the body remain high resulting in  damage to the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. Type 1 Diabetes cannot be prevented but it can be managed through a combination of medication, healthy food choices and exercise. People with Type 1 diabetes need to manage their blood sugar levels with insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and can be helped by maintaining a healthy weight and through making dietary changes and lifestyle changes.

Gestational Diabetes affects some women during pregnancy when they can’t produce enough insulin to meet  the demands of a growing foetus – sometimes up to three times that of normal needs. Gestational diabetes usually disappears after pregnancy, however the woman’s risk of developing risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases by 50-60% in the future, so Diabetes NZ advises yearly blood tests.

The main symptoms of diabetes are frequent urination, excessive thirst, extreme hunger, abnormal weight loss, increased fatigue, irritability, recurrent infections, blurry vision and erectile dysfunction in men.

Claire says some people may not be aware they have diabetes, so if they recognise any or all of the symptoms above, they should see their GP, who can arrange blood tests.

World Diabetes Day is November 14.

 

 

Current News

Waikato DHB Health System Plan

10 April 2019

Waikato DHB have just released their draft Health System Plan, which sets out how they want the health system to work for our people – and they’re wanting feedback from you.  Do you think they’ve got it right?  What is most important for you? 

They’ll be in Thames to outline the plan and to hear your feedback on Wednesday 17th April, 2:00 to 3:30 pm at the Thames War Memorial Civic Centre. They’re offering a further drop-in session that evening, anytime from 6:30 to 7:30 pm

If you prefer, you could email them your comments to HealthSystemPlan@waikatodhb.health.nz or complete their online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/healthsystemplan

You can read the plan at http://www.waikatodhb.health.nz/hsp

Now’s your chance to have your save, whānau, so take some time to give them your feedback.

Be prepared for measles

27 March 2019

Following a measles outbreak in Canterbury and two reported cases in Auckland this month, Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki clients are urged to be alert to possible measles symptoms.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads easily from person to person through droplets in the air, via breathing, coughing and sneezing as well as  through contact.

Anyone unimmunised who has been in the same room as someone with measles will likely get it.

Measles can be life threatening, with about 1 in 10 people needing hospital treatment. It can also lead to other complications, including ear infections (which can cause permanent hearing loss), diarrhoea, pneumonia, seizures and swelling of the brain – this is rare, but can cause permanent brain damage or death.

Up to 30% of people with measles will develop complications – usually children under five and adults over the age of 20.

Measles affects both children and adults and is easily preventable by having a measles vaccine. In New Zealand, if you were born in 1969 or later, you can get the measles vaccine for free. 

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki has the measles vaccine in stock.

Two doses of the measles vaccine provides the most effective protection for yourself, your family and the wider community. After one dose of the MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccine, which is scheduled at 15 months and four years, about 95% of people are protected from measles. After two doses of the MMR vaccine, more than 99% people are protected.

If you have no documented record of two vaccinations, it is recommended that you have a booster of MMR.  If you are not sure if you’ve had two vaccinations and there is no documentation, you can have a booster – it won’t do any harm. 

If parents are very worried and want to have the vaccine earlier they need to speak to a Nurse to see if it is appropriate for the individual child.

Vaccination is particularly important if you are planning to travel anywhere overseas – to protect yourself and to help prevent outbreaks in New Zealand.

Pregnant women cannot have a MMR.

The symptoms of measles are a cough, runny nose or conjunctivitis, a fever above 38.5, followed by a rash starting around the head and spreading to the body.   

Anyone with measles needs to be isolated from the time they become ill until five days after the rash has appeared. It is extremely important to stay in isolation if you’re asked to do so, to protect vulnerable people including babies, pregnant women, cancer patients and others who are unable to be immunised.

Phone Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki if you want to see if you need a booster or to make an appointment – 0508 835 676 (freephone).

Information in this article sourced from Ministry of Health.

Hikoi mō te hauora - Walking for our wellbeing

25 February 2019

Come walking with us

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Whānau Ora Navigators are hoping whānau will join the Hikoi ā Whānau walking series around Hauraki during March.

Walking is FREE and a great way  to connect with your community! 

Walking reduces stress, lowers your blood pressure, improves sleep and energises you!

Hikoi ā Whānau offers: 

Aroha – giving with no expectation of return;

Whanāungatanga – It’s about being connected;

Whakapapa – knowing who you are;

Mana/Manaaki – building the mana of others, through nurturing and growing; and

Korero awhi – positive communication.

 Join us 

No matter what your age, size, level of fitness or situation 

 

Waihi - March 6: 10.30am - 12 noon – Meet at the Goldmine lookout

Thames - March 13: 10.30am - 12 noon – Meet at Victoria Park

Coromandel - March 20: 10.30am-12 noon – Meet at the Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki clinic

Paeroa  - March 27 10.30am- 12 noon – Meet at Paeroa Domain

 Contact your

Whānau Ora Navigator

if interested in joining

Hikoi ā Whānau 

or phone
07 868 0033 

 

 

 

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