News

Let's talk about mental health

Let's talk about mental health

10 April 2018

Those who have experienced mental health and /or addiction issues or who know or support someone who has, have the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences in a series of hui around the Hauraki and Waikato rohe designed to ensure people get the right support when they want and need it.

Five “Let’s Talk About What Matters to You” hui will be held in Ngātea, Colville, Coromandel, Te Aroha and Paeroa this month. The hui are run by the Waikato District Health Board in conjunction with Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki, and will help guide the new direction of mental health and addiction services in the Hauraki and Waikato rohe.

Mental health services don’t always meet the needs of the people they are intended to help and the hui will enable people to have a say in their own and their loved ones’ futures. 

For more information, or to register your interest to attend, contact Fiona Wasiolek 07 868 0033; fiona.wasiolek@korowai.co.nz or Jennifer Ashman 07 839 8899 ext 97409 or email jennifer.ashman@waikatodhb.health.nz

Current News

Tamariki Ora/Well Child - reaching those important milestones

23 April 2018

Raising a baby can be a wonderful experience, but at times it can be daunting and overwhelming – even more so when you’re a young mum.

At 18, Zariah Timothy is mum to Mataira Timothy-Gillett, who, at four months old, is thriving on her whānau and young mum’s aroha.

But, regardless of age and whānau support, new mums still need reassurance that their babies are reaching all their milestones and that they have access to the appropriate health services and checks that set the foundation for their lifelong health and wellbeing.

Tamariki Ora Well Child is a Ministry of Health initiative offering a series of health assessments, immunisation education and support services for children and their families from birth to five years. The programme is delivered to 645 children throughout Hauraki rohe by health provider Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki.

It also includes health promotion activities and is an important gateway for parents to access primary and specialist health care, education and social services.

Tamariki Ora Well Child nurse visits can start at birth or at six weeks, depending on the midwife’s referral. 

Registered nurse Krista Harries has been visiting Mataira in her own home since she was six weeks old. While mums can also opt to take their babies to a clinic, Zariah, from Thames, appreciates the convenience of not having to take her baby out of the house when it’s time for her check-ups.

“Keeping baby in her own home keeps her happy and settled during the visits and makes Krista’s visits a little easier,” she says.

Zariah also enjoys the “whānau-based approach” Tamariki Ora Well Child offers.

“When Krista comes, it’s almost like a friend coming to visit baby and me, not just a nurse,” she says.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Manager of Oranga o te Tangata (Public Health and Health Promotion Services) Debbie Petersen-Pilcher says Tamariki Ora Well Child also works closely with other services to support families where needed.

“It is about whānau ora and ensuring we provide services that wrap around our whānau, support their aspirations toward wellness and build upon our vision for Hauraki to be a healthy nation,” she says.

 

 

 

Let's talk about mental health

10 April 2018

Those who have experienced mental health and /or addiction issues or who know or support someone who has, have the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences in a series of hui around the Hauraki and Waikato rohe designed to ensure people get the right support when they want and need it.

Five “Let’s Talk About What Matters to You” hui will be held in Ngātea, Colville, Coromandel, Te Aroha and Paeroa this month. The hui are run by the Waikato District Health Board in conjunction with Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki, and will help guide the new direction of mental health and addiction services in the Hauraki and Waikato rohe.

Mental health services don’t always meet the needs of the people they are intended to help and the hui will enable people to have a say in their own and their loved ones’ futures. 

For more information, or to register your interest to attend, contact Fiona Wasiolek 07 868 0033; fiona.wasiolek@korowai.co.nz or Jennifer Ashman 07 839 8899 ext 97409 or email jennifer.ashman@waikatodhb.health.nz

Let's Talk mental health

26 March 2018

Those who have experienced mental health and /or addiction issues or who know or support someone who has, have the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and experiences in a hui designed to ensure people get the right support when they want and need it.

The “Let’s Talk About What Matters to You” hui on April 5, run by the Waikato District Health Board in conjunction with Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki, will help guide the new direction of mental health and addiction services in the Hauraki and Waikato rohe.

Mental health services don’t always meet the needs of the people they are intended to help and the hui will enable people to have a say in their own and their loved ones’ futures. 

The hui will be held at the Thames Memorial Civic Centre in two sessions – from 9am-12 noon for those who have experienced health and addiction issues, their whānau, support workers, helpers, friends and other interested people; and the 12.20-4pm session for service providers, primary health, government agencies, NGOs, community members and schools.

The hui will move around the Waikato District over the next three months,  including Ngātea (April 16),  Coromandel, Colville (April 17), Paeroa, Te Aroha (April 23); Waihī, Whangamatī(May 15);  Whitianga (May 25) and Tairua (June 12). 

For more information, or to register your interest to attend, contact Fiona Wasiolek 07 868 0033; fiona.wasiolek@korowai.co.nz or Jennifer Ashman 07 839 8899 ext 97409 or email jennifer.ashman@waikatodhb.health.nz

Watch this page for venue updates.

 

Love your own heart

21 February 2018

Every 90 minutes a New Zealander dies from heart (cardiovascular) disease. It is the leading cause of death in New Zealand and the number one killer of women globally - even though it is often thought of as a male problem.

In New Zealand, 172,000 people are living with heart disease – that’s one in 20 people – with Māori adults more than twice as likely to die from heart disease than European New Zealanders and 1.5 times more likely to die from stroke.

Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. It can incorporate a number of conditions, including atherosclerosis (a build-up of fatty plaques in your arteries), angina (when your heart muscle does not get as much blood and oxygen as it needs), high blood pressure or hypertension (where your blood moves through your blood vessels with extra force, leading to damaged arteries and a higher risk of  heart attack and stroke) and heart failure, where the heart struggles to pump blood around the body.

This month is Heart Awareness Month and an opportune time for people to take stock of their heart health.

While some heart diseases are congenital (what you’re born with) or hereditary (family history), others can be prevented or treated by making healthy lifestyle choices.

Major modifiable risk factors include smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, insufficient physical activity, obesity, diabetes, poor nutrition and an excessive intake of alcohol.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Nurse Practitioner Esme Maloney says people can improve their heart health by consuming a healthy diet high in fibre, vegetables and fruit, moderating their alcohol intake, quitting smoking and exercising regularly.

She says it is important to break the bad heart health cycle by educating our tamariki about healthy lifestyle habits from a young age.

“Bring your kids up in an environment where they drink water instead of sugary drinks and eat fresh food rather than deep-fried takeaways and processed foods, which are often full of trans fats,” she says.

“And make sure everyone gets outside for some fresh air and exercise.  Doing just 30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day such as brisk walking can help to reduce your risk of heart disease.

The Heart Foundation Big Heart Appeal is on Friday 23 and Saturday, 24 February.

News Archive