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Under 5 Energise programme cuts tooth decay

Under 5 Energise programme cuts tooth decay

27 June 2017

Cutting out sugar has cut tooth decay in Waikato preschool children by a fifth, according to an article in the NZ Herald.

The Under 5 Energize programme, started in 2013 in 121 of the Waikato's 500 early childhood centres, has cut the number of children with visible tooth decay in their before-school health checks from 10.9 per cent to 8.7 per cent.

Under 5 Energize is contracted to Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki to cover the Thames-Hauraki rohe.

For full story, click on the link below: 

Healthier kids

Current News

Under 5 Energise programme cuts tooth decay

27 June 2017

Cutting out sugar has cut tooth decay in Waikato preschool children by a fifth, according to an article in the NZ Herald.

The Under 5 Energize programme, started in 2013 in 121 of the Waikato's 500 early childhood centres, has cut the number of children with visible tooth decay in their before-school health checks from 10.9 per cent to 8.7 per cent.

Under 5 Energize is contracted to Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki to cover the Thames-Hauraki rohe.

For full story, click on the link below: 

Healthier kids

Look out for warning signs of bowel cancer

19 June 2017

It’s one of those body parts that a lot of people don’t want to talk about, but a healthy bowel is crucial to our wellbeing.

So, let’s get talking and learn a bit more about our bowel.

The bowel, also called the colon or intestine, is a tube-like organ that is part of the alimentary canal or digestive tract - the small intestine leading from the stomach, with the large intestine ending at the anus or back passage.

Most digestion of food occurs in the small intestine, while the large intestine is where the leftovers form and get ready to leave our body. If our body is functioning well, we will have normal, healthy bowel movements but sometimes things can go wrong – one of the major indicators of this happening is when bowel motions change – there may be bleeding, we will notice that our movements are more fluid like and/or you may become constipated. These are warning signs and need to be checked out by a doctor.

Unfortunately, some of these symptoms can indicate bowel cancer, but, according to Bowel Cancer New Zealand, if caught early enough, 75% of bowel cancer cases can be cured.

New Zealand has one of the highest rates of bowel cancer and bowel cancer deaths in the developed world with more than 3000 people diagnosed and 1200 deaths from the disease each year.

Most bowel cancers start as benign growths on the wall of the bowel called polyps and will not go any further. One type, though, called adenoma can become cancerous and, if untreated, will form a tumour in the bowel, which can then metastasise - or spread - to other parts of the body, mainly the liver or lungs.

Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki lead nurse, Esme Maloney says the earlier bowel cancer is caught, the easier it is to treat.

“This Month is Bowel Cancer Awareness month and an opportunity for people to become aware and recognise the signs and symptoms of bowel cancer,” she says. “If anyone has noticed any changes in their bowel movements or any other changes, they should see their doctor immediately.”

Other symptoms to look out for are soreness or strain when having a bowel motion, lumps and achiness, a persistent change in bowel habits, going to the toilet more often or experiencing looser stools for several weeks, abdominal pain - especially if severe, any lumps or mass in your tummy and weight loss and tiredness (a symptom of anaemia).

For more information, go to http://beatbowelcancer.org.nz/

Matariki celebrations come early for Paeroa kaumātua

9 June 2017

Paeroa Kaumātua rōpū will kick off Matariki early next Tuesday with a celebration at Paeroa War Memorial Hall.

There’ll be lots of waiata, fun and games for all, as well as raffles and kōrero from guest speakers Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki Board Member Taima Campbell and Pacific Coast Technical Institute Programme Tutor Jude Robinson.

Matariki is the name for the star cluster known as the Pleiades. Its reappearance in late May or early June signals the beginning of the New Year.

In the past, different iwi celebrated Matariki at different times. For some it was when Matariki rose in May-June; for others, it was celebrated at the first new moon, or full moon, following the rising of Matariki. This year, the new moon following the rising of Matariki on June 24 signals the beginning of the Māori New Year.

Wherever and whenever it is celebrated, Matariki is about a time of coming together, socialising, feasting, learning and teaching. It is a time of wānanga and celebration of whānau, hapu iwi and our culture.  It is both traditional and contemporary and it is the time of change and an ending of seasons and a period of preparation for the new season.

So, whilst  Matariki appears during the season when it is wet, cold, the ground becomes infertile or an inactive growing season, it is also known as a time of renewal – hence the reason why Māori believe this to be the beginning of the New Year.

With the rising of Matariki 2017 comes some exciting plans for changes to ensure the future flow and efficiency of Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki.

A proposed central communication hub, already practised in other clinics, will triage or prioritise the needs of clients from the time they phone or make a request for an appointment to ensure that the right service is delivered by the right health professional at the right time.

Taima Campbell will take the opportunity to explain the Hub concept to kaumātua and manuhiri at Paeroa.

It is also proposed to extend the current operating hours of the acute care (walk-in) pathway at the Thames clinic for clients with acute care needs.

“With the introduction of Smart Health and the installation of video-conferencing facilities into Te Korowai clinics, it is now timely to consider how these tools enhance the way services can be delivered to Hauraki whanau,” Taima says.

With all things new, there can be a steep learning curve and nowhere is this more apparent than with modern digital phones. While the intention of mokopuna and whānau buying their mātua a new phone so they can stay in touch via Skype or get the benefits of other nifty apps is a great idea, sometimes this can be a bit overwhelming for them.

“Sometimes they might not even know how to turn a new phone on,” Kaumātua Programme Coordinator Hariata Adams says.

So, it is with arms wide open that we welcome Jude Robinson, who will offer helpful hints to enable kaumātua to use their new phones. Jude will also give more information on the free institute programme that will offer more advanced tricks of the trade on digital phones.

So, come along and enjoy the fun!

 Matariki tāpuapua

The Matariki season when water lies in pools

What: Paeroa Kaumātua Rōpū Matariki Celebrations
Where: Paeroa War Memorial Hall
When: Tuesday, June 13, 10.30am-2.30pm
Bring: Plate and a gold coin donation

To find Matariki, look low on the horizon in the northeast of the sky between 5.30 and 6.30am.

1: First find the pot (the bottom three stars of the pot are also called Tautoru, or Orion’s Belt). To find Puanga (Rigel) look above the pot until you see the bright star.

2: To the left of the pot, find the bright orange star, Taumata-kuku (Alderbaran).

3: Follow an imaginary line from Tautoru (the bottom three stars of the pot), across to Taumata-kuku and keep going until you hit a cluster of stars -  Matariki.

Directional information taken from https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/learn/matariki-maori-new-year/matariki-whare-tapere/matariki-star-facts

Caption: The picture above from AstronomyNZ, shows the relative position of Matariki (Pleiades) to Taumata-kuku (Alderbaran), Tautoru (Orion’s belt), Puanga (Rigel) and Takurua (Sirius).

 

Going pink for breast cancer

2 June 2017

It was pink, pink, pink everywhere on Wednesday as kaimahi and kaumātua came together at Te Korowai Hauora o Hauraki to raise funds for Breast Cancer.

After setting a target of $200, the Pink Ribbon breakfast held at the Wharehui in Thames and outer clinics raised the grand total of $366.40

While kaimahi had fun dressing up on the day – CEO Riana Manuel reiterated the sobering fact of why everyone had gathered – that 8 women a day in New Zealand and 20 men each year are diagnosed with breast cancer.

Kaimahi and kaumātua gathered at the Wharehui kitchen early – cooking up batches of pink pancakes, whizzing up pink smoothies and decorating the walls with pink flags and balloons, while the tables boasted pink tablecloths, serviettes, plates and flowers and an incredible range of delectable and healthy delights kaimahi and kaumātua had poured their aroha into creating - ranging from cupcake salads, chia porridge and protein cookies to berry bliss balls, muffins and mueslis served in the tiniest of cups.

Two quizzes were held, with Debbie Petersen, Poukura Oranga, Manager Public and Health Services, acting as Quizmaster.

The first quiz offered fun general knowledge questions such as: “Where are bagels made?” (surprisingly, it wasn’t the USA – it was Poland!), while the other was a breast awareness educational quiz, kaimahi and kaumātua learning breast cancer information, such as when a woman should start having mammograms (40 years), the smallest size a lump can be detected by mammogram (2mm) and how much was raised via the 2016 Pink Ribbon Breakfasts - $1.7 m.

Mel Shea, Poukura Pūtea, Finance Controller won the educational quiz, with various kaimahi winning brooches, keyrings and balloons in the fun quiz.

Mel also supplied a sweet fundraiser, with Jo Belworthy, Communications and Marketing, correctly guessing that there were 66 pink marshmallows in a jar, while Poukura Tāngata Emma Redaelli’s son Jack was the closest guess to the number of red liquorice in the jar - guessing 99 for the 100 that were in there!!

Funds from the nationwide Pink Ribbon Breakfasts will go towards funding vital research as well as support for those who have already been diagnosed with breast cancer.

A grand fundraising effort and a lot of fun. Tumeke!

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